Category Archives: Resource

5 reasons you should have an emergency kit at home & how to Build Your Own

Always thinking about homesteading and letting you know why you should be doing it too. Here are 5 reasons why you should have an emergency kit at home and then there’s a link below on how to build your own.

  1. An emergency kit at home can help you and your family to be prepared for any kind of emergency situation. It can provide you with essential supplies and tools you may need to get through the emergency.
  2. Having an emergency kit can give you peace of mind knowing you have the necessary items to handle any type of crisis that may arise.
  3. An emergency kit can provide you with the necessary items to help you stay safe and comfortable if you need to evacuate your home or if you are stuck in an emergency situation.
  4. Having an emergency kit can help you to be prepared in the event of a natural disaster, such as a flood, earthquake, or hurricane.
  5. An emergency kit can help you to be prepared for medical emergencies, such as a severe allergic reaction or a heart attack. It can also provide you with the necessary items to take care of minor injuries or illnesses.

click here to see how to build your own 5 Gallon bucket emergency kit

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Are you prepared for upcoming emergencies? #motownmom #homesteading

I know you barely have enough to pay the bills and you’re not looking for another worry, but when emergencies happen we want to be proactive and not reactive

I’m not a prepper expert or some homesteading genius, but I’ve always been on my toes.

Perhaps being from Detroit made me like this. I also would say growing up with my father also put a little of it in me.

I love this graphic and even though it’s for power outage it’s good for almost everything.
  1. From every paycheck I would take 5 to 20 dollars and use it on emergency food and supplies
  2. I kept a list on Amazon of emergency supplies and when I had built up a fund I could use it
  3. I had a bag with copies of emergency papers and cards. For immunization records I would ask them for a duplicate (most times I could get them for free upon asking).
  4. There was always a go bag near the set of emergency papers. The kids knew if there was ever an emergency grab the bags and get out of the house.
  5. I had a pantry where at the bottom was the emergency food and medicine so I could do a FIFO and continually use it so it wouldn’t go bad.
  6. Dry packs and Ziplocks are life. Get them and put them in your emergency places to make sure your good, paperwork and supplies stay dry.

The picture above is just to get you started. Start with short term (72 hours) and then push it to six months, one year and finally a 3 to 5 year plan. This isn’t going to be something you can do over night. It took be about a good twenty years to really have a good five year plan and that includes extra land I could go to, a portable solar powered solution and I’m even going to invest in a fallout/panic room where I say and solar back up on my home.

Initially, if you can’t go with a large solar generator, you can always start with a smaller battery your car can charge or get a smaller battery rechargeable battery (at least 100w), and then an inverter that your solar panels can plug into as well.

This battery takes electrical and solar input. It’s enough to charge a laptop and phones, possibly a low powered cPap and keep a mini desk refrigerator running for about 8 hrs.

https://amzn.to/3BXhmWfhttps://amzn.to/3BXhmWf

I like the two AC plugs the most because most units this size only come with one.

How many of these items do you have in your house right now?

Happy preparing for emergencies

Are you prepared for upcoming emergencies? #motownmom #homesteading

I know you barely have enough to pay the bills and you’re not looking for another worry, but when emergencies happen we want to be proactive and not reactive

I’m not a prepper expert or some homesteading genius, but I’ve always been on my toes.

Perhaps being from Detroit made me like this. I also would say growing up with my father also put a little of it in me.

I love this graphic and even though it’s for power outage it’s good for almost everything.
  1. From every paycheck I would take 5 to 20 dollars and use it on emergency food and supplies
  2. I kept a list on Amazon of emergency supplies and when I had built up a fund I could use it
  3. I had a bag with copies of emergency papers and cards. For immunization records I would ask them for a duplicate (most times I could get them for free upon asking).
  4. There was always a go bag near the set of emergency papers. The kids knew if there was ever an emergency grab the bags and get out of the house.
  5. I had a pantry where at the bottom was the emergency food and medicine so I could do a FIFO and continually use it so it wouldn’t go bad.
  6. Dry packs and Ziplocks are life. Get them and put them in your emergency places to make sure your good, paperwork and supplies stay dry.

The picture above is just to get you started. Start with short term (72 hours) and then push it to six months, one year and finally a 3 to 5 year plan. This isn’t going to be something you can do over night. It took be about a good twenty years to really have a good five year plan and that includes extra land I could go to, a portable solar powered solution and I’m even going to invest in a fallout/panic room where I say and solar back up on my home.

Initially, if you can’t go with a large solar generator, you can always start with a smaller battery your car can charge or get a smaller battery rechargeable battery (at least 100w), and then an inverter that your solar panels can plug into as well.

This battery takes electrical and solar input. It’s enough to charge a laptop and phones, possibly a low powered cPap and keep a mini desk refrigerator running for about 8 hrs.

https://amzn.to/3BXhmWfhttps://amzn.to/3BXhmWf

I like the two AC plugs the most because most units this size only come with one.

How many of these items do you have in your house right now?

Happy preparing for emergencies

Are you prepared for upcoming emergencies? #motownmom #homesteading

I know you barely have enough to pay the bills and you’re not looking for another worry, but when emergencies happen we want to be proactive and not reactive

I’m not a prepper expert or some homesteading genius, but I’ve always been on my toes.

Perhaps being from Detroit made me like this. I also would say growing up with my father also put a little of it in me.

I love this graphic and even though it’s for power outage it’s good for almost everything.
  1. From every paycheck I would take 5 to 20 dollars and use it on emergency food and supplies
  2. I kept a list on Amazon of emergency supplies and when I had built up a fund I could use it
  3. I had a bag with copies of emergency papers and cards. For immunization records I would ask them for a duplicate (most times I could get them for free upon asking).
  4. There was always a go bag near the set of emergency papers. The kids knew if there was ever an emergency grab the bags and get out of the house.
  5. I had a pantry where at the bottom was the emergency food and medicine so I could do a FIFO and continually use it so it wouldn’t go bad.
  6. Dry packs and Ziplocks are life. Get them and put them in your emergency places to make sure your good, paperwork and supplies stay dry.

The picture above is just to get you started. Start with short term (72 hours) and then push it to six months, one year and finally a 3 to 5 year plan. This isn’t going to be something you can do over night. It took be about a good twenty years to really have a good five year plan and that includes extra land I could go to, a portable solar powered solution and I’m even going to invest in a fallout/panic room where I say and solar back up on my home.

Initially, if you can’t go with a large solar generator, you can always start with a smaller battery your car can charge or get a smaller battery rechargeable battery (at least 100w), and then an inverter that your solar panels can plug into as well.

This battery takes electrical and solar input. It’s enough to charge a laptop and phones, possibly a low powered cPap and keep a mini desk refrigerator running for about 8 hrs.

https://amzn.to/3BXhmWfhttps://amzn.to/3BXhmWf

I like the two AC plugs the most because most units this size only come with one.

How many of these items do you have in your house right now?

Happy preparing for emergencies

FYI Kitchen Resource for measurements for busy moms #momtools #printout

The ultimate measurement conversion chart

Tape it to the inside of a kitchen cabinet for easy reference

#measureit#cookingmeasurments#bakingmeasurements

Here’s a great chart I found that will help start your gardening process #homesteading #motownmom

Soon as I saw it, I just knew I had to post it here. I’ve started my peas, corn , onion, Chinese broccoli and basil already. I haven’t decided what else I’m going to grow yet. Next week, I’m cleaning up the containers to start planting outdoors. What are you growing?

Use the fall to update your contacts #motownmom #homesteading #preparedness #detroit

Grab a journal and make sure it’s known by all household members

My survival book with my hubby, also pictured with my garden book as well. Cheap journals from the dollar tree.

I call mine the survival book. It’s tabbed out from Contacts (Directory), Supplies in the House, Evacuation Plans, Tips and Notes.

This has all our contacts written down including addresses, phone numbers & emails. (I pulled from our wedding list, printed it out and added to the book)

Today we’re talking about Contacts

Emergency Contacts are the phone numbers that you have instructed ADT to call if we receive an an emergency alarm signal or to confirm a false alarm from your protected premises.

During an alarm event, ADT will first call the number(s) you have designated as your primary number. This number is typically your residence, mobile phone or place of business. If there is no answer at this primary number (or under other circumstances), ADT will call the people on your Emergency Contact list in the order in which you have listed them.

We recommend that you have at least three contacts in your list. Update your contact list.

Who to Put in there and how

Of course family and close friends. I have mine highlighted for importance. Who I need to call first in hot pink and then family in yellow. Secondary friends in a light green.

Establishing a circle is important because if crap hits the fan I want to hurry up and find people or I need to know fast who needs to be help. I put different colored dots for handicap, seniors and single mommies.

This also helps in contacts when I had to call people after my husband was rushed to the hospital. I didn’t have to think about it. I just knew who to contact and in what order.

This list should be done annually and discussed with all parties in the house.

Contact Guidelines

The people listed in your contact list should:

  • Be aware that they are on the contact list if they are in the red. They know in an emergency they will be contacted if YOU have an emergency. At least two of these people should know a special password or the password that when said verbally it’s a real emergency.

Your contact list may change when you travel out of town, so sometimes you may add an addendum sheet and take a picture of it when you travel.

We Are Being Told To Prepare For High Prices At Grocery And It’s Likely Food Shortages Only Get Worse | #BusyMom Grocery List #motownmom

Click here to watch this video

Being prepared is not becoming a prepper, but rather an urban homestead.

Make sure your household has at least three month of food and sundry supplies at all times. Also use list and have a way others in the house hold can let you know when things are running low. Make all people in the household responsible for the household.

I keep a board or we use Alexa to keep track of items we need in the house.

Here’s a list of Grocery Lists for the busy household you can use to print out and help you determine what you need

MOTOWN MOXIE MOM GROCERY LIST

 

REMINDER: September is Nat’l Preparedness Month #motownmom #homesteading #detroit

Making a plan has always been beneficial for me. I don’t wait for September and you don’t either, but focus is put on this month to prepare and make sure your family is ready for anything.

I dont consider myself a prepper, but more of a homesteader, that is ready for the worst to happen and knowing what to do when it does and preparing my family for that moment so we can work together.

From being a single mom of three, my #firestory and to just taking the every day and dealing with in – especially in Detroit – having a plan of action for our household for ANY SITUATION has been a prioprity.

You may say it takes away from being a child, but in this day and age, you need a unit – a family – MORE in time of crisis than you need a child.

This whole month FEMA did a weekly way for you to prepare, but if you missed the beginning of the month, here is the whole list.

If you’re reading this and it’s not September, I say start now in homesteading and prepping your house and family for what’s to come as “insurance” to be prepared. I get a lot of friends say they don’t know where to start.

Well here’s your guide:

from https://www.ready.gov/national-preparedness-month-social-media-toolkit

Week 1: Make a Plan

  • #PrepareToProtect means preparing to protect everyone you love. Start by making a plan before disasters and emergencies strike. www.ready.gov/plan
  • Discuss with your household or family how you will communicate if there is an emergency.
  • Decide and practice your emergency plan with members of your household.
  • Houses, mobile homes, apartments, and high-rise buildings have different evacuation considerations. Make a plan for each: www.ready.gov/plan-for-locations 
  • Involve your entire family, including your children, in planning for disasters and emergencies so they are prepared, not afraid www.ready.gov/plan

Week 2: Build a Kit

  • Create or update your emergency supplies with this list: www.ready.gov/kit
  • Make sure your emergency kit is ready to go in case you need evacuate. Include:
    • Enough food and water to last several days.
    • Medication, face masks and disinfectant for everyone in your household.
    • Pet supplies.
  • When building a kit, people with disabilities should consider the items they use daily, as well as life-sustaining items. www.ready.gov/disability
  • Have medication for at least three days in your emergency supplies.
  • Check the expiration date on your emergency supplies, and replace any old items. 
  • Get the kids involved in building their own emergency kit: www.ready.gov/kids/build-a-kit
  • Kids bored? We can help. Check out our online Ready Kids Build A Kit game: www.ready.gov/kids/games 
  • Include your child’s favorite stuffed animals, board games, books or music in their emergency kit to comfort them in a disaster.

Week 3: Low-Cost, No-Cost Preparedness

  • Download or order your free preparedness products to help your family plan and prepare for the next emergency. www.ready.gov/publications
  • Drills aren’t just for your toolbox. Practice emergency drills with your family regularly. 
  • Emergencies can happen anytime, and less than half of American families have a communication plan. Plan ahead: www.ready.gov/kids/make-a-plan 
  • Make preparing fun for kids! Go on a scavenger hunt around your house for items you already have to add to your disaster supply kit. Follow this list: www.ready.gov/kit and see how many items you can check off!
  • Know what disasters and hazards could affect your area, how to get emergency alerts, and where you would go if you and your family need to evacuate. Visit: www.ready.gov/be-informed.

Week 4: Teach Youth About Preparedness

  • Review your family emergency communications plan with kids at your next household meeting.
  • Kids, parents, & educators, visit the Ready Kids web pages in Spanish: www.ready.gov/es/ninos
  • Need tips for talking to your kids about natural disasters? Visit www.ready.gov/kids/parents
  • Many Americans aren’t familiar with their child’s school evacuation & reunification plans. Are you?
  • Kids can become Disaster Masters with this @Readygov preparedness game: www.ready.gov/kids/games 
  • Get involved in Teen CERT. Find opportunities by learning about Teen CERT online: www.ready.gov/kids/teen-cert
  • Your community needs YOU! Find opportunities to help your community here: www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness

One day I’ll make videos and talks about my preps around my house and how we have done it without breaking the bank.

Let me know in the comments how you homestead and what questions or concerns you have so we can all help each other

#MotownMom #DetroitHomesteading [video] 20 Preps to buy Every Month #Prepperstockpile